Category Archives: Fauna

Peregrine and stock dove

Saturday 1 May

Very quiet with very few humans walking reserve but saw a Peregrine with small bird in talon fly into a hedge just by the path and then away toward the estuary.

There was a Stock Dove amongst the Woodpigeons by the two table feeders by Pony Wood.

Seen Today

Looking into Upper Sowerholme from a garden, I saw a chiffchaff singing away.

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Also on the border between the Aldcliffe Road gardens and Upper Sowerholme was a bullfinch.

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Then walking round to Pony Wood there was a swallow over the Arable Field, a reed bunting by the path and the two oystercatchers were sunning themselves in the field.

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Then in Pony Wood box P2 was being occupied by two blue tits, both went inside.

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In addition, the linnets were continuing to feed on the bird tables.

Oystercatchers

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Yesterday a couple of oystercatchers were in the Arable Field.

I am not sure whether they are the same birds that we see across the Canal.

Last year a pair nested on the roof of B&Q!

Stoat

Tuesday 2 March

What I thought was a weasel but now know was a stoat (had a black tip to tail) was scurrying and leaping about in the grassy tussocks just up the hill from the bird feeding table.  Dark brown top coat and white undergarments.  Was being carefully watched by a pair of magpie as well as a number of humans.

Half a dozen Reed bunting and a couple of pairs of Chaffinch at the feeder.

Wintering Blackcap

Female Blackcap in the tall trees the other side of the path from the shed at the Sunnyside Lane entrance to the Reserve.

A BTO factsheet on wintering Blackcaps has the following interesting information:

“A growing number of Blackcaps that breed in central Europe are coming to our shores to spend the winter instead of travelling to the Mediterranean, where they normally go. In Britain, food provided in gardens, coupled with our warming winter climate, is helping Blackcaps to survive. The reward for enduring harsher winter conditions here than in the Mediterranean is that our Blackcaps have a shorter journey back to central Europe in the spring, meaning that they can stake early claim for the best territories. Central European-breeding Blackcaps that winter with us have been found to lay more eggs and fledge more chicks than those that winter further south.”

https://www.bto.org/sites/default/files/u23/downloads/pdfs/factsheet_blaca.pdf