Welcome to the Fairfield Association Blog

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WANTED! Your Wildlife Sightings

The Fauna and Flora fields are being actively managed for wildlife. In particular, we are trying to encourage Brown Hare, Snipe, Lapwing and Starling, Grey Partridge and Tree Sparrow. (These are all ‘feature species’ in our agreement with Natural England.) Hare and Snipe have been doing well since Fauna was established. Amazingly, a couple of Grey Partridge appeared in the West Field in Flora only a few weeks after the scrape was dug. And Lapwing have been seen displaying over the arable field following the ploughing.

Note: During the nesting season, please send sightings of ground-nesting birds, such as lapwings and oyster-catchers, directly to sue AT nieduszynski DOT org to avoid them being disturbed. Many thanks!

We would be very grateful for your help in monitoring our success in attracting these species. And we would also love to hear of any interesting wildflowers, insects, small mammals that you spot, as well as any other birds that you see in the reserve and in Fairfield Orchard too.

All of this information will assist us in our management of the nature reserve. It will also provide us with evidence to feed back to Funders, such as Natural England and the Heritage Lottery, and to support future funding applications.

Please tell us about your sightings on this blog – ideally giving time, date, location and numbers.

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2 thoughts on “Welcome to the Fairfield Association Blog

  1. Mick Short

    This morning a group were in Flora Field doing a survey of insect life on our beetle banks and near Pony Wood. Nothing spectacular was discovered but now we have a baseline for comparative use in future years.

    On the way back, near Alder pond, we saw a meadow pipit and also damselflies and dragonflies on the pond edge.

    Finally, we received some expert advice on how to use barley straw better to control the algae on our ponds. In the Spring we had merely scattered barley straw on the water, and that seems to be having a good effect. However, we were told that we need to remove the barley straw after 6 months, when it becomes less effective and apply fresh barley straw. Early Spring and August are good times. It was recommended that we used garden fruit netting to create a long ‘sausage’ of barley straw, 12-18 inches in diameter, attach floats to it (e.g. 3 or 4 empty plastic milk bottles) to keep it afloat and stake if from one side of the pond to another, near an edge the cattle do not use to drink from.

  2. Mick Short

    Grey partridge release

    Neil and Gill Sutcliffe (the farmers who have sown and harvested our arable crop in Flora Field) have generously donated two pairs of young grey partridge to the nature reserve. The birds were released at 9.30 am this morning (7 August 2014).

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